Terms and Conditions

Transit

Photographs are sent through the postal service at the owners risk and the company Remember Me Photos

is not liable for any damage which occurs whilst in transit.

Type of work

Work will not be carried out on photographs which can be deemed to be obscene,

depict violence or unlawful behaviour.

Copy right UK

 The copy right on all photos should be owned by yourself or you should have the permission of the copy right owner .

Where this is not possible you should attempt to find the copyright owner.

You will be asked to complete a disclaimer to that effect.

Copies of commercial photos eg school photos  or wedding photos taken by the official photographer

should not be copied with out permission.

 More information on copyright can be found by clicking here

GDPR statement

 

Our Company collects the following data:

  • Personal identification information (Name, email address, phone number, etc.)
  • You directly provide Our Company with all of the data we collect. when you register onlineor place an order for any of our products or services. 
  • Our Company collects your data so that we can process your order and manage your account. 

How do we store your data?

Our Company securely stores your personal data on  a company PC and it is not stored on the web.

Completed images may, if you chose, be stored in a private dropbox for you to access from home.

Our Company will keep your personal data for 2 years.

Once this time period has expired, we will delete your data.

Your images can be stored for you for a longer period if required.

Exceptions: Images that have agreed to be used on the web for publicity will be stored indefinitly at your consent.

Consent can be withdrawn at any time.

What are your data protection rights?

Our Company would like to make sure you are fully aware of all of your data protection rights.

Every user is entitled to the following:

The right to access – You have the right to request Our Company for copies of your personal data. 

The right to rectification – You have the right to request that Our Company correct any information

you believe is inaccurate. You also have the right to request Our Company to complete the information

you believe is incomplete.

The right to erasure – You have the right to request that Our Company erase your personal data,

under certain conditions.

The right to restrict processing – You have the right to request that Our Company restrict the processing

of your personal data, under certain conditions.

The right to object to processing – You have the right to object to Our Company’s processing

of your personal data, under certain conditions.

The right to data portability – You have the right to request that Our Company transfer

the data that we have collected to another organization, or directly to you, under certain conditions.

Changes to our privacy policy

Our Company keeps its privacy policy under regular review and places any updates on this web page.

This privacy policy was last updated on 12 June 2020

How to contact us

If you have any questions about Our Company’s privacy policy, the data we hold on you, or you would like to exercise one of your data protection rights, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Email us at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

How to contact the appropriate authority

Should you wish to report a complaint or if you feel that Our Company has not addressed your concern in a satisfactory manner, you may contact the Information Commissioner’s Office.

 

 

Copy Right 

Photographs taken on or after 1 August 1989

On the whole, the photographer will own the copyright in their photograph for their life plus 70 years,

unless they have created the photograph in the course of employment or signed an agreement to the contrary.

Where a photographer works by commission, they will own the copyright in the photograph unless they have assigned or sold it to the commissioner.

Photographs taken between 1 July 1912 and 31 July 1989

The person who owned the material on which the photograph was taken, for example the negative, also owned the copyright.

In the case of photographs taken under commission for “valuable consideration” (money or any equivalent payment), the commissioner was the copyright owner, unless there was an agreement to the contrary.

Photographs taken before 1 July 1912

The photographer owned the copyright in the photograph, unless it was taken under commission for “good or valuable consideration” (money or any equivalent payment). In such circumstances the commissioner owned the copyright.

How long copyright lasts

Photographs taken on or after 1 January 1996

These are automatically protected for the life of the photographer plus 70 years. 

Photographs taken on or after 1 August 1989 but before or on 31 December 1995

These were originally protected under the 1988 Act for the life of the photographer plus 50 years. Copyright in these works has now been extended by the 1995 Regulations. They are therefore now protected for the life of the photographer plus 70 years.

Photographs taken between 1 June 1957 and 31 July 1989

The length of copyright protection for photographs created in this period depends on whether or not they had been published as at 1 August 1989.

(A) PHOTOGRAPHS PUBLISHED BEFORE 1 AUGUST 1989

Where the photographer died more than 20 years before publication, copyright will expire 50
years after first publication. In all other cases, copyright will expire 70 years after the death
of the photographer.

(B) PHOTOGRAPHS WHICH REMAINED UNPUBLISHED AS AT 1 AUGUST 1989

Where the photographer died before 1 January 1969, copyright expires on 31 December
2039. In all other cases, copyright will expire 70 years after the death of the photographer.

Photographs made before 1st June 1957

These photographs were originally protected for a period of 50 years from the end of the calendar year in which they were taken (regardless of whether they were published or not).

If the photograph was still in copyright as of 1 July 1995 however, the period of copyright was extended to the life of the photographer plus 70 years. If copyright protection had expired before 1 July 1995, there was still the chance to "revive" the photograph. An eligible photograph would then  be protected by the new term, ie the photographer's life plus 70 years.

Find out if a photograph is eligible to be "revived" below.

Whether copyright can be revived in old photographs

The 1995 Regulations allowed for the copyright in some old photographs to be "revived" if they were in copyright somewhere in the European Economic Area (EEA) as of 1 July 1995.

For example, if a photograph was taken in 1930 in the UK and the photographer died in 1940, then under the 1911 Copyright Act and until the 1995 Regulations were introduced into UK law, copyright in such a photograph would have expired in 1980.

Some European territories such as Germany already protected photographs for the life of the photographer plus 70 years. If this new term of copyright protection were applied to the photograph, then copyright would not expire until 2010. 

This meant that although the photograph had been in the public domain since 1980, its copyright could be "revived". 

Who owns copyright in a revived work

The owner of the revived copyright will be the former owner (ie the person who owned the copyright immediately before it expired).

If that person died before 1 January 1996 or was a company that ceased to exist before 1 January 1996, then the revived

 

 

copyright will pass to the photographer or the photographer's heirs. 

Print

News

Gallery

Facebook

Contact

Email: Info@remembermephotos.co.uk

Tel: 07568 926784